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  1. Chris

    One of my driving philosophies behind following a plan is that it is always flexible and changeable. Unexpected situations often occur and I have to re-adjust and adapt. You’ve made a very clear description of idea ⇒ results.

  2. Peg Wortman

    Yes, and please share a little of my offered mistiness here, Barry: We are working with words, which are necessarily constructs and that carry connotations that may differ from writer to reader. So there’s some apparent separateness already.

    Also, there are my fingers, an extension of what seems a separate self, typing on a keyboard with the intention of reaching you, when we are already one. So it seems that all our efforts to pull our apparently-separate selves together add up to extra work we make for ourselves, and more apparent separateness.

    I can’t remember which poet, but the gist was that that the slayer thinks he slays and the red bull thinks he is slain…..

    The only things I seem to be able to do about all this are (a) to love — not love anything in particular, because that makes it separate, but just to love; (b) be aware that my own sense of awareness, of being, of self, is sort of like a pimple; a bit of ego wanting to be visible; (c) laugh both at and with, and (d) dance, by which I mean anything that seems like play.

    I ask, WHY do people want to reach, to love, to understand, to teach, to slay each other? Only because they think they are separate. The mental image I am seeing just now is that of a pebble dropped into a pool….. the rings expand and return, expand and return….. but it’s NOT a pebble; wouldn’t a pebble be extraneous?. What is IT? Is IT the idea of “separateness”?

    And yet although everything is one, everything must eat or die; have offspring or die out. I end up feeling that love and grief are both the reward and the tragedy of the state of self-awareness, and sometimes the only thing to do is to laugh.

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